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Spring Produce Guide: What’s in Season

Spring: weather starts to warm, the sounds of songbirds fills the air, and fresh produce brings new flavors to the table. Check out which fruits and veggies peak each spring and some delicious recipes to try them in.

Asparagus


Asparagus spears are crisp and sweet whether they’re steamed, simmered, roasted, grilled, sautéed, wok-fried, or served raw in a salad. They’re also a good source of fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins A, C, E, and K.

Pro tip: Thinner spears tend to be more tender.

Blue Cheese Spring Salad




Spring Panzanella Salad



Scallions


Also known as spring onion, green onion, and salad onion, scallions have less bite than most onions. They can be eaten raw or cooked, and add both texture and color to your cooking. Keep in mind, the lighter part of the scallion packs more intense flavor.

Light Veggie Ranch Salad




Crunch Topped Stuffed Potatoes



Carrots


Carrots are among the most popular vegetables in America. This crunchy, earthy, and nutritious root vegetable can be as small as two inches and as long as twenty feet. And whether you prefer baby or big, carrots are rich in Vitamin A and potassium, which can improve your vision and reduce high blood pressure.

Pickled Carrot Sticks




Spring Caesar Salad



Leeks


Another member of onion family, leeks have a sweeter, more delicate flavor than shallots, chives, and scallions. Their white, firm stems taste great in soups and side dishes.

Creamy Ranch Potato Soup



Peas


These legumes are a health nut’s sweet treat. Add them to your family’s favorite pasta and green salads.

Pro tip: Peas are best eaten just-picked because their sugars start to turn to starch as soon as they’re off the vine. Freezing them can help hold their flavor.

Poppyseed Pasta Salad




Spring Salad with Asparagus, Peas, and Potatoes



Artichokes


Their nutty flavor and meaty texture make artichokes a delicious topping or snack. To test for ripeness, squeeze the artichoke. The heavier, firmer ‘chokes are ready to eat. The stem should be green and the leaves still clinging together.

Spinach Artichoke Pizza




Grilled Baby Artichokes



Spinach


The mild flavor of spinach makes this spring veggie adaptable to a range of uses. Try it raw in salad, sautéed with garlic and pepper, or blended in smoothies with bananas and milk.

Pro tip: The high water content in spinach means it reduces in size when cooked, so don’t be shy when adding it to your pot.

Spinach Arugula Orzo Salad




Classic Spinach Salad



Beets


Whether you use the common red or the slightly sweeter golden variety, beets can add a tender texture to any meal. And don’t stop at the root, the green leafy tops are also edible – and highly nutritious.

Beet and Toasted Walnut Salad




Chickpea Salad



Fennel


The bulb is the main attraction when it comes to fennel. Consisting of overlapping layers, it’s reminiscent of a cabbage, but much firmer. One of our favorite veggies for salads and slaws, fennel bulbs can be easily sliced thin using a mandolin.

Mixed Greens with Cheese and Pomegranate Dressing




Chicken Over Jicama, Fennel, Radicchio & Peach Salad



Broccoli


These flowering vegetables are part of the cruciferous family, like cabbage, kale, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. It can be enjoyed raw or cooked, with stem or without. Steaming, sautéing, and roasting all make warm, delicious florets. For something different, blanch some broccoli and serve cold with other seasonal favorites.

Roasted Broccoli Salad




Garden Chopped Salad